Monday, April 14, 2014

The WW2 record of Brigadier Gen. James Stewart

The James Stewart blogathon is an event devoted to the life and career of the great Golden Age actor, presented by the Classic Film & TV Cafe. For a complete list of participating bloggers, please visit the host site.

James Stewart is fondly remembered today as one of Hollywood's finest actors, but to those members of the Greatest Generation who fought in World War 2, Stewart is also remembered as a war hero, who served with great distinction as a member of the US Army Air Corps.

Stewart had piloting experience from his younger years. Born in Indiana, Pennsylvania in 1908, he had an deep interest in aviation as a child. Charles Lindbergh, whom he would go on to portray in the movies one day, was his idol. In college, however, he gained a greater interest in acting, which led to theater work (where he first met, among others, Henry Fonda and Margaret Sullavan), and eventually, a career in Hollywood. Aviation still interested him, though, and in 1935 he got his civilian pilot's license and bought his own plane. In 1938, he obtained a commercial pilot's license.


Stewart was drafted into the fight in Europe, entering before Pearl Harbor led to America's formal declaration of war. In February 1941, the same month in which he'd win his one and only Best Actor Oscar, for The Philadelphia Story, he went to his local draft board but was turned down for being underweight, so he spent the next month bingeing on spaghetti, steak and milkshakes until he barely made it in a second time.

Inducted as a private on March 22, 1941, Stewart underwent basic training at Moffett Field, California and was a media sensation. During this time, in addition to his education, he was a flight instructor and a narrator for training films, and also went on war bond tours. By the spring of 1943, he rose to the rank of captain, serving as operations officer for the 703rd Bomb Squadron, 445th Bombardment Group of the Eighth Air Force.


By November, he led the B-24 Liberators, who were part of the Second Air Division, out of Royal Air Force Station Tibenham in England. The B-24 was a bomber plane, generally used with the B-17 on daylight raids throughout Europe, with a cruising speed of 215 MPH and a maximum speed of 290 MPH. The standard crew compliment was anywhere between seven and ten. In addition to bombs, they were outfitted with M2 Browning machine guns. Over 18,000 B-24 bombers were made by the war's end.

Stewart led several bombing missions that winter, including one on Christmas Eve in France, before getting promoted to major in January 1944. In March, he was transferred to RAF Old Buckenham as group operations officer of the 453rd Bombardment Group, a B-17 unit, where he continued to lead sorties. By the spring of 1945, he made colonel and was named chief of staff of the Second Air Division, having completed twenty raids with the 445th and the 453rd. He came home in September, remaining part of the Air Force Reserve as commander of Dobbins Air Reserve Base. In 1959, he was promoted one more time, to the rank of brigadier general.

Among the military accolades awarded to Stewart for his service include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Distinguished Flying Cross with Oak Leaf Cluster, the French Croix de Guerre with Palm, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He retired from the Air Force on May 31st, 1968.

The book Jimmy Stewart: Bomber Pilot goes into much greater detail about Stewart's war record from the perspective of one who served with him, author Starr Smith, an intelligence officer assigned to Stewart.

This short propaganda film, Winning Your Wings, was narrated by Stewart and directed by John Huston in 1942.



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Other James Stewart films:

18 comments:

  1. Jimmy certainly had an impressive military career and no discussion of the man is complete without it.

    Here's the brigadier general in a guest appearance on "My Three Sons" speaking on the importance of education: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nc0oY-YSTdc

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  2. 1963. Vietnam would've been right around the corner. Interesting.

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  3. Rich, I loved your post because--though I'm very familiar with Stewart's film work--I knew very little about his military service. I find it fascinating that Stewart was decisively engaged in combat missions vs. just increasing morale or making promotional films (though he apparently did that, too) . Now, I need to check the book you referenced JIMMY STEWART: BOMBER PILOT. This was a fabulous addition to the blogathon.

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  4. Thanks. Like many of these blogathons, this was a learning experience for me too. I knew, of course, that Jimbo was a pilot in the war and served with distinction, but seeing how much of a hero he really was blew me away. He gave up a comfortable life as an Academy Award-winning movie star to go fight in a long and brutal war where he could've been easily killed or maimed, and not only did he live, but he made a difference.

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  5. What a fascinating post! Thank you for sharing this information about General Stewart. You have given all of us another reason to truly admire a man who cared about his country.

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  6. How was I so unaware of Stewart's life before Hollywood? I must confess, I had never considered his formative years, but now I've read this a lot of his personality 'traits' and a lot of the things I love about him seem to fit into place. Thank you for sharing!

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  7. One thing I learned through this, or at least had never made a connection to until now, was how the kinds of films he made after the war were darker and more morally ambiguous in comparison with his pre-war stuff. It never occurred to me that the war might've made a difference.

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  8. Good stuff, Rich! I always kind of connect Jimmy Stewart in my mind with ballplayer Ted Williams as the two biggest stars who served like regular guys during WWII. It's not an area of Stewart's life that I've read into, so I appreciate you filling in the details for me.

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  9. I guess I thought most of this stuff was better known than it is.

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  10. This information just adds to the "like" factor of Jimmy Stewart. As a mom to a soon-to-be veteran, there is a feeling of pride when one ponders those who have served their country.

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  11. I would imagine so. The more I learn about WW2, the more I understand why it's so unique in American and world history.

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  12. What a respectable guy! How can anyone not absolutely adore this man?! Great write-up- I'm a huge aviation fan myself so this was really wonderful to read...

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  13. Thanks for this great post. Not only was he a quality actor, he was a quality human being.

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  14. And that's why we still remember him.

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  15. Maybe the military service made Americans more proud of him, didn't it?
    I truly admire the actors who were part of the military. In a post I wrote about it, when my blog was starting and I knew very few on the subject, I eneded up asking: which personalities nowadays would enlist if there were a World War? Few to none.
    Don't forget to read my contribution to the blogathon! :)
    Greetings!
    http://www.criticaretro.blogspot.com.br/2014/04/ouro-do-ceu-pot-ogold-1941.html

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  16. Don't think we can know that for sure unless it actually happened. I'd like to think even modern celebs would be willing to fight to defend their loved ones.

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